One Nation, Under God

Articles written by Rose Teske


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  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, December 27, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Dec 27, 2023

    Cole, Montana was a whistle-stop community about 10 miles northwest of Saco on the Great Northern Railroad branch line to Turner. In 1934, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers was looking for gravel to use in the building of Ft. Peck Dam. Charles McChesney and Stan Hetrick of Saco notified them that gravel could be found in the Cole area. Tests were run and they indicated that there were millions of cubic yards of gravel. The J. L. Shiely Company of St. Paul set up a gravel screening and washing plant. Other contracts for toe and blanket gravel...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, December 20, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Dec 20, 2023

    The town of Bowdoin came into being in April 1917, when the Great Northern Railway created a new division point on their railroad line. Contracts for the construction of 15 miles of tracks, a 23-stall roundhouse, a storehouse, coal chute, water treating plant, office building, depot, railroad hotel and restaurant, ice house and ice tram and water reservoir were let the week of April 19, 1917. By November 1917, work was completed on all the contracts at the cost of approximately $200,000. On November 18, train crews and workers were moved from...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, December 13, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Dec 13, 2023

    Did you know there was a commercial fishing industry in Phillips County at one time? In 1922, the McNeil brothers, Hinsdale area sheep ranchers, seined and shipped 120,000 lbs. of live carp caught in Nelson Reservoir to Jewish markets in New York City. The fish were transported to Bowdoin in 25 to 100 lb. boxes and put on the train to arrive alive at their destination. In November 1922, the State Fish and Game Commission in Helena authorized the McNeils to sein and remove carp and other non-game fish from Nelson and also, the Milk River...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, December 6, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Dec 6, 2023

    All of us are aware of the Sleeping Buffalo Rock on Highway 2 between Malta and Saco. It was originally one of several on a ridge near Cree Crossing on the Milk River. H. G. Robinson first saw the rocks in 1892, when he observed a lone Native American dismount from his horse, raise his hands in prayer and walk toward it. The man left beadwork, tobacco and red calico cloth on the rock. The rock is part of the cultural past of the Assiniboine, Gros Ventre, Cree, Chippewa and Blackfeet tribes. All these tribes have stories about the role the rock...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, November 29, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Nov 29, 2023

    The Civilian Conservation Corps, or CCC, was part of the Emergency Conservation Work Act of 1933. Young, unemployed men were recruited to perform conservation work throughout the U.S. Camp Milk River BR69 was located at Trafton Park in Malta. The first workers arrived on July 17, 1938. The first job the young men had was to construct the camp. They graded the grounds, laid sewer and water lines and erected buildings. Once the camp was established, they planted grass, trees and shrubs. In September 1938, the men started working on the Milk...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, November 22, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Nov 22, 2023

    In the late 1920s and early 1930s, a lot of poultry was raised for sale in Phillips County. In 1931, 39,543 pounds of turkeys, ducks, geese and chicken were shipped through the Phillips County Turkey Pool. Fifty-six growers sold through the Pool that year. In December 1932, nearly 20,000 pounds of dressed turkeys were shipped from Malta to eastern markets for the Christmas season. It was stated that 95% of the birds delivered were graded prime and the balance were choice. A few commercial-grade birds were sold locally at ten cents per pound. Th...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, November 15, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Nov 15, 2023

    In early March 1920, Malta found out it would be on the new transcontinental highway that was being planned across the northern U.S. It started at Portland, Maine and crossed the extreme southern part of Ontario, north of Lake Erie. From Grand Forks, North Dakota westward the highway closely followed the Great Northern Railway. The highway was completed in a piecemeal fashion. In 1920, 29 miles in Toole County, 36 miles in Hill, 25 in Blaine and 40 miles in Roosevelt were to be graveled. Work being completed depended on the passage of road...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, November 1, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Nov 1, 2023

    While researching a request for information about the Malta Enterprise Publishing Company I ran across some interesting history of early-day Malta newspapers. The first issue of the Malta version of The Enterprise was published on May 8, 1900. The paper had been started in Harlem the previous year by J. D. B. Grieg. The paper was moved to Malta because of “the increased amount of advertising offered by the businessmen of Malta”. According to some sources Mr. Grieg had also had some physical altercations with Harlem businessmen. On Jan. 1,...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, October 25, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Oct 25, 2023

    While researching last week’s story about the Great Northern branch line, I ran across some interesting railroad statistics from J. C. Banks, Saco Depot agent. In 1927, 228 cars of grain and flax were shipped out of Saco. That was the most grain ever shipped from the three Saco elevators. There were also 152 cars of livestock and five cars of miscellaneous merchandise shipped out. The railroad also delivered 160 carloads of merchandise to Saco. Those shipments included 38 cars of oil/petroleum, 19 of lumber, 14 of agricultural equipment,...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, October 18, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Oct 18, 2023

    How many of you remember the Great Northern Railway branch line that ran from approximately two miles west of Saco, north through Cole, Whitewater, Loring and on to Turner and Hogeland? Surveying for the line started in late August 1927. Construction started in April 1928. Approximately 2,000 men worked day and night shifts and in late October the line was completed at a cost of just under two million dollars. The first freight train went over the line one day after the workers were finished. The completion of the line allowed farmers to take...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, October 11, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Oct 11, 2023

    In the spring of 1927, it was estimated that between five and ten thousand horses were running loose in Phillips County. In an effort to improve the grazing for the cattle and sheep industry, the county commissioners created a horse round-up district of about 1600 square miles running from the eastern edge of the county to Bowdoin, down to the Missouri River, and west to the Blaine County line. Jake Myers was in charge of the round-up in western Phillips County while Hugh Simanton was in charge of the eastern section. The roundups started on Ap...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, October 4, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Oct 4, 2023

    In 1920, two Saco citizens William Scheele and O. R. Hawver spearheaded an effort to create a new county comprised of the eastern part of Phillips County and the western part of Valley County. The county was to be called Milk River County. The western boundary went from the Missouri River north past Content which would be in the new county. Then it jogged northeast past Bowdoin to Nelson Reservoir and then angled northwest to the Canadian line. The eastern boundary was just east of Hinsdale. Petitions for and against the new county were...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Sep 27, 2023

    In March of 1920, a group of Malta businessmen including Sandy Pray, Harry Whitcomb, Burt Moylan and B. H. Koke formed a corporation called the Fur Specialty Farming Co. Stocks were sold in Malta and the surrounding area. The old co-operative store on Front Street was set up to house a special variety of fur-bearing rabbits. Sandy Pray went to Fargo, N.D., to attend a special course on raising rabbits. Over 250 rabbits of every size and color arrived in Malta in early April. Further shipments were expected in the following weeks. According to...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Sep 20, 2023

    Corn was a big crop in Phillips County in the early 1920s. The first Annual Northern Montana Corn and Potato Show was held in Malta in early November 1922. The show was held in the lobbies of the new courthouse according to The Enterprise newspaper. Corn was on the first floor, potatoes on the second, and small grains, grasses and forage on the third. Twelve northern Montana counties participated with about 1,250 people attending over the course of the three days. There were 400 exhibits of corn comprised of 4,800 ears, 158 exhibits of...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Sep 13, 2023

    In the fall of 1902, Lear Humphrey, a Malta High School teacher was running for Valley County Superintendent of Schools (Malta was still part of Valley County at that time). Not everyone supported her run for office. In fact, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction came to Malta earlier in the fall to straighten out trouble between Miss Humphrey and the Valley County Superintendent of Schools. Miss Humphrey’s brother was a popular Glasgow businessman. J. R. Stephens, a Glasgow area stockman and deputy collector of customs, was not...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Curator|Sep 6, 2023

    In the early 1900s, Montana rural schools were given a rating based on the building, the grounds, the equipment, the teacher, and community spirit. In the spring of 1920, Landusky School achieved the rank of Superior School. Credit for their Superior rating was given to several people: Miss Sadie McClellan who taught three successive terms and got the school to a Standard rating, Miss Margaret Nantelle, the current teacher who in addition to teaching the students also taught adult singing classes and French lessons, and Mrs. O. P. Andrews, a...

  • Phillips County Museum News for Wednesday, August 30, 2023

    Rose Teske, P. C. Museum Co-Curator|Aug 30, 2023

    Did you realize the first memorial erected in Montana to honor Montana artist Charles M. Russell, is along Highway 2 in Saco? The monument consists of a 10-ton stone from Snake Butte, south of Harlem, resting on a rock base. It was dedicated on June 24, 1956. The project was spearheaded by William J. Nankeman with the assistance of area people. Nankeman chose Saco as the site for the monument since Russell’s painting “Loops and Swift Horses Are Surer Than Lead” took place in the Larb Hills south of Saco in 1904. The painting shows...